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Reperations Rally in Chicago
Reperations Rally in Chicago

Video of Darrell Cannon, recorded and edited by Caroline Siede.

The Homan Square facility, exposed as a CIA-style "black site" where police detainees would be brutalized without access to lawyers or relatives, is nothing new to those familiar with the violent legacy of police commander Jon Burge.

Die Antwoord's Ninja: CHAPPiE, The Boing Boing Interview
Die Antwoord's Ninja: CHAPPiE, The Boing Boing Interview

Ninja of Die Antwoord speaks with BoingBoing.net's Xeni Jardin about the making of the robot drama CHAPPiE, directed by fellow South African Neill Blomkamp. Chappie is in theaters March 6.

More at boingboing.net.

Dolphins learn to spin
Dolphins learn to spin

In the fascinating hour-long documentary, cutting-edge spy cameras disguised as sea creatures – including a robotic dolphin, tuna, nautilus and squid – capture never-before-seen footage of dolphins in their natural habitat.

Trailer: Ninja of Die Antwoord talks CHAPPiE with Boing Boing's Xeni Jardin
Trailer: Ninja of Die Antwoord talks CHAPPiE with Boing Boing's Xeni Jardin

A short tease of Xeni Jardin (Boing Boing)'s conversation with Ninja, star of Neill Blomkamp's raw science fiction blockbuster CHAPPiE and of the South African zef-rap-rave band Die Antwoord. Visit BoingBoing.net March 6 for the full-length conversation, and see CHAPPiE in theaters opening the same day. #zef #chappiemovie #dieantwoord

Have fun skinning garlic cloves with this rubber tube
Have fun skinning garlic cloves with this rubber tube

Many people, including the delightful Alton Brown, dislike unitasker gadgets. I'm not one of them. What's wrong with a unitasker if it is a joy to use, and you find yourself using it frequently? Take for instance, this five dollar garlic skinner.

Just insert a clove of garlic into the tube, place your open hand over the tube, and roll back and forth a few times. The rubber will tear the skin off the clove, making it ready for dicing, grating, or pressing. It makes a pleasant rustling sound, too!

http://amzn.to/1JEArOf

Swimming!
Swimming!

boingboing.net

My favorite way to decapitate strawberries
My favorite way to decapitate strawberries

It didn't take me long to get the hang of the Stem Gem Strawberry Huller, and once I did, I was able remove the stem and core of strawberries much faster than I could with a knife. Get one here: http://amzn.to/1EFOnkf

Tidying guru KonMari declutters a client's bookshelves
Tidying guru KonMari declutters a client's bookshelves

In this Boing Boing exclusive video, Marie Kondo, author of the NY Times #1 best seller The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing (http://amzn.to/1z2w5pY), travels from Japan to the United States to help a woman tidy her bookshelves. The best part is where KonMari (as she is known to her fans) gently slaps the books to wake them them up. This is so she and her client can "better feel their energy" and determine which of the books truly spark joy, and which ones end up in the donate pile.

Small millipede under microscope
Small millipede under microscope

This millipede is crawling around in a USB microscope lens cap with a diameter slightly smaller than a penny. I bought the microscope on Amazon for $39.95: http://amzn.to/16hVunl

Varidesk - excellent adjustable standing desk
Varidesk - excellent adjustable standing desk

I've been using a Varidesk [http://amzn.to/1ytDXnr] review unit for the past four weeks, and I love it. It's a platform that sits on your existing desk, and allows you to easily raise and lower your computer and keyboard, so you can sit and stand throughout the day.

I typically start my workday standing up, and I'll alternate between standing and sitting an hour at a time. I've been using the Pro Plus model ($350), which is the largest one they make, and I'm glad I didn't get the Single, because I like to keep notebooks, books, iPads, phones, etc. within easy reach. The Pro Plus has enough real real estate to hold that extra stuff on it. The Pro Plus has two platforms – one for the computer/monitor, and another for the keyboard. The Pro model ($300) only has one platform for the keyboard and the monitor, which means you'd have to tilt your head down to look at the display.

As you can see in the above video, it's easy to raise and lower the platform.You just grip the levers on either side and guide it to one of the several different locking positions. The hinged braces have springs to assist you, so it's pretty effortless. I think the fully extended position would work with a treadmill, which I want to get soon.

One thing that is a must with a standing desk is and anti-fatigue floor mat. I've been using Varidesk's branded mat ($50) and am pretty happy with it. But after an hour, I'm ready to plop in a chair.

I've experimented with home made standing desk contraptions for years, but I always abandoned them after a few months because I didn't like not being able to sit down at my desk. The Varidesk solved this problem. I intend to use it for the rest of my life.

Boost Plus Near-Field Audio Amplifying Speaker
Boost Plus Near-Field Audio Amplifying Speaker

Doesn't require a wireless signal.

ABCs OF DEATH 2: "D is for Deloused"
ABCs OF DEATH 2: "D is for Deloused"

From director Robert Morgan. This is a stop-motion animation short that contains some of the creepiest handmade horror we've ever seen.

T-Shirt printer spits them out in 30 seconds
T-Shirt printer spits them out in 30 seconds

These cost $20k from Epson.

Cat jumps on wall to catch reflection
Cat jumps on wall to catch reflection

Zelda likes to chase a dot of sunlight reflected off the face of a wristwatch. We will both be sad when the sun runs out of helium in 5 billion years and we won't be able to play like this any longer.

Brew coffee 19th century style with a balancing siphon
Brew coffee 19th century style with a balancing siphon

Looking for a whimsical yet scientific way to serve coffee or tea to guests with showy flair? Consider the Continental balancing siphon coffee brewer developed in the 19th century.

This week in Idiombusters
This week in Idiombusters

By Heather Beschizza. Coming soon: Cut Off Your Nose To Spite Your Face.

Bearded Dragons eating meal worms
Bearded Dragons eating meal worms

Mark's bearded dragons love to eat meal worms. He tries to limit them though, because they need to eat their vegetables.

Bob Mould on Boing Boing: interview and performance
Bob Mould on Boing Boing: interview and performance

On the occasion of this month's release of Bob Mould's latest album, the majestic Beauty & Ruin, Bob kindly spent a day with Boing Boing to share his stories and songs from three decades. We are honored to share that singular experience with you here.

This Boing Boing Video was masterfully directed by Scott Compton of San Francisco's mighty Remedy Editorial (http://remedyeditorial.com). Laura Marks produced. Bart Nagel and John Behrens were directors of photography. Sound recording by Philip Perkins. Bart Nagel, John Behrens, Cliff Grodin, and Scott Compton did the shooting. Sterling Storm art directed. Makeup by Deb Czerwinski. Joel White was the video's editor and Marc Pittman mixed the sound. Ayumi Ashley was colorist, Chris Valente handled post production, and Mike Lowe was VFX supervisor. Special thanks to Norman Bonney. Bob Mould is managed by Jordan Kurland and Mike Frye at Zeitgeist Management

More information here:
http://boingboing.net/2014/06/25/bob-mould-old-punk-kicks-new.html

Excuse me... epic terror version
Excuse me... epic terror version

A remix of the Ben Frisch original.

Tim's Vermeer Blu-Ray edition trailer
Tim's Vermeer Blu-Ray edition trailer

Read Tim Jenison's article about recreating the 17th century room in Vermeer's "The Music Lesson"

http://boingboing.net/2014/06/10/vermeers-paintings-might-be.html

Trailer: Bob Mould on Boing Boing
Trailer: Bob Mould on Boing Boing

Coming in June to Boing Boing: Bob Mould, an interview and live performance from this legend of punk rock.

More here:
http://boingboing.net/2014/05/28/bob-mould-on-boing-boing-video.html

Happy Mutant Mobile: First Look!
Happy Mutant Mobile: First Look!

Boing Boing, with support from our sponsor Ford, transformed a 2014 Transit Connect Wagon into the Happy Mutant Mobile! Here's a first look at the nearly complete vehicle.

Directed by Eric Mittleman.

More info:
http://boingboing.net/2014/05/15/boing-boings-happy-mutant-mo-5.html

Spherical Magnet Through an Aluminum Tube, Part 1et2
Spherical Magnet Through an Aluminum Tube, Part 1et2

A useful aspect of the cause-and-effect relationship between electricity and magnetism is that it's reversible."Useful" is an understatement, as modern civilization totally depends on it. Instead of passing electricity through a coil to create a magnetic force, you can pass a magnet through a coil to generate electro-motive force--that is, electricity flowing through the wire. The moving magnetic field interacts with electrons and pushes them around. This principle is used in the generation of electricity in power stations everywhere in the world.

Suppose we imagine a loop of wire becoming a closed ring of metal. Now imagine that the ring is stretched to become a tube. Moving a magnet through the tube still pushes the electrons around, although now they are just running in circles. These circulations are called eddy currents.

For a dramatic demonstration of the consequences, all you have to do is drop a powerful magnet through a tube made of metal that is nonmagnetic but is a good electrical conductor. Copper or aluminum will do the job. The magnet behaves as if it's falling through molasses. Nothing visible is preventing it from falling freely, but its interaction with electrons in the tube requires energy, and the energy is obtained by stealing it from the pull of gravity.

Even this is not the whole story. Electrons flowing through a conductor will generate some heat. This is the principle which causes a fuse to blow if too much current flows through it, as the fuse gets hot and melts.

Very little heat is created if the conductor has a low resistance--but still, the heat is there. Therefore the work that is done by gravity, pulling a magnet through a tube, is converted partially into heat. Energy, as always, is conserved.

In the days when I was learning about electricity and magnetism, I never saw the tube-and-magnet demo. Aluminum was costly back then, and simple iron magnets were not very powerful. A neodymium magnet is necessary to create a significant, dramatic effect. These are the strongest known type of magnets, developed collaboratively by General Motors and Hitachi in the 1980s.

See http://boingboing.net/2014/05/13/magnet.html

Spherical Magnet Through an Aluminum Tube, Part 1
Spherical Magnet Through an Aluminum Tube, Part 1

A useful aspect of the cause-and-effect relationship between electricity and magnetism is that it's reversible."Useful" is an understatement, as modern civilization totally depends on it. Instead of passing electricity through a coil to create a magnetic force, you can pass a magnet through a coil to generate electro-motive force--that is, electricity flowing through the wire. The moving magnetic field interacts with electrons and pushes them around. This principle is used in the generation of electricity in power stations everywhere in the world.

Suppose we imagine a loop of wire becoming a closed ring of metal. Now imagine that the ring is stretched to become a tube. Moving a magnet through the tube still pushes the electrons around, although now they are just running in circles. These circulations are called eddy currents.

For a dramatic demonstration of the consequences, all you have to do is drop a powerful magnet through a tube made of metal that is nonmagnetic but is a good electrical conductor. Copper or aluminum will do the job. The magnet behaves as if it's falling through molasses. Nothing visible is preventing it from falling freely, but its interaction with electrons in the tube requires energy, and the energy is obtained by stealing it from the pull of gravity.

Even this is not the whole story. Electrons flowing through a conductor will generate some heat. This is the principle which causes a fuse to blow if too much current flows through it, as the fuse gets hot and melts.

Very little heat is created if the conductor has a low resistance--but still, the heat is there. Therefore the work that is done by gravity, pulling a magnet through a tube, is converted partially into heat. Energy, as always, is conserved.

In the days when I was learning about electricity and magnetism, I never saw the tube-and-magnet demo. Aluminum was costly back then, and simple iron magnets were not very powerful. A neodymium magnet is necessary to create a significant, dramatic effect. These are the strongest known type of magnets, developed collaboratively by General Motors and Hitachi in the 1980s.

See http://boingboing.net/2014/05/13/magnet.html

Kitten, 9 days old, crying with maximum cuteness
Kitten, 9 days old, crying with maximum cuteness

Ah, listen to this 9 day old kitten's adorable squeals! Warning: MAY CAUSE YOU TO DIE OF CUTENESS. Boing Boing pal Miles O'Brien was learning how to fly his camera drone with one hand after recently becoming one-handed. At the drone flying range near Washington, DC, a friend had a few 9-day old kittens hanging out on a blanket. They're pretty adorable. If you would like to adopt one of them, contact Nikki Driver at ndriver8411@gmail.com. She is a vet, so they're in good hands. She and the kittens are near Charlottesville, VA. Video shot by Miles. —Xeni Jardin.

More about Miles: milesobrien.com/?p=3640
More about the kittens: http://boingboing.net/2014/04/19/kittens.html

Portlandia's Carrie Brownstein chats with Xeni and Mark of Boing Boing
Portlandia's Carrie Brownstein chats with Xeni and Mark of Boing Boing

Xeni Jardin and Mark Frauenfelder of Boing Boing chatted with Portlandia's Carrie Brownstein about the different characters she and Fred Armisen play on the show, what it was like working with the Dead Kennedy's Jello Biafra on an episode, Carrie's upcoming memoir, and what it's like to have a TV show that's more popular on Google than the town it's based in.

Shot at Meltdown Comics in Hollywood, California.

Hawk eats Pigeon: time-lapsed
Hawk eats Pigeon: time-lapsed

With music by Ryan Zak: https://soundcloud.com/moment-music

Hawk eats Pigeon
Hawk eats Pigeon

S. a novel conceived of by J.J. Abrams
S. a novel conceived of by J.J. Abrams

S - http://amzn.to/1aNDTRl

Curious Carrot
Curious Carrot

Pesco's kids' babysitter found this curious carrot in a bag of Bunny-Luv Organic Peeled Baby Carrots. Wonder what kind of machine malfunction produced this anomaly. (Thanks, Kelsie Pyle!)

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/10/01/incredibly-curious-carrot.html

Ford Transit modded into mobile library
Ford Transit modded into mobile library

This post is sponsored by the Ford Transit Connect:

As regular Boing Boing readers know, we are all big library geeks. Nothing beats browsing rows and rows of books where you can take anything that tickles your fancy home with you to read... free! That's why we loved the story of the Batram Trail Regional Library bookmobile, a transformed Ford Transit Connect that replaces the library's 30-year-old vehicle. When the bookmobile and its dedicated librarians visit children's schools, the little ones climb inside while the bigger kids browse their own shelf exposed by opening the Transit Connect's sliding door. If the Batram Trail Regional Library bookmobile isn't parked at pre-K facilities, daycares, and special needs schools, it's likely on its way to a nursing home or making housecalls to homebound readers. Georgia's history of bookmobiles goes back to the Great Depression when custom pick-up trucks piled with books were driven from county to county. Times have changed, but the mission to bring books to everyone remains the same.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/10/01/ford-transit-modded-into-mobil.html

Breaking Bad Science Advisor Dr. Donna J. Nelson: the Boing Boing interview
Breaking Bad Science Advisor Dr. Donna J. Nelson: the Boing Boing interview

Miles O'Brien, PBS science correspondent, and Boing Boing's Xeni Jardin interview Dr. Donna J. Nelson, science advisor to the AMC series "Breaking Bad." Dr. Nelson is a professor of chemistry at the University of Oklahoma who specializes in organic chemistry.

Here's our Boing Boing blog post for the interview: http://boingboing.net/2013/09/27/258361.html

More videos, episode recaps, and related fun stuff for fans of the best show on television, in Boing Boing's Breaking Bad archives: http://boingboing.net/tag/breaking-bad.

(Special thanks to video editor Eric Mittleman)

Editor's Note: There's a goof in the title card here--we taped the interview in August 2012, not 2011.

Boing Boing Hack Day: The Director's Cut
Boing Boing Hack Day: The Director's Cut

Watercolors painted by a robot based on vehicle data. A remote control toy car that mimics the route of a real car. A synthesized symphony conducted by your automobile. These were only a few of the fantastic, curious, and delightful projects created in just a day at Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven, our first-ever hack day in San Francisco on August 17. More than 50 folks got their hands dirty with data through our partner Ford's OpenXC hardware and software platform Boing Boing's talented video director Eric Mittleman and his crew captured dozens of hours of video from multiple roving cameras that Eric has now edited into this rollicking short documentary about the experience. Thank you to all of the brilliant hackers who inspire us with their creativity, support of open source, and, yes, ingenuity!

More at:
http://boingboing.net/tag/ingenuity

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max

Adam Savage: Ground Rules for Success
Adam Savage: Ground Rules for Success

The infinitely curious, brilliant, and kind Adam Savage gave the closing benediction at our Boing Boing: Ingenuity theatrical experience at a former Masonic Lodge in San Francisco on August 18. The co-host of Mythbusters, co-founder of Tested, and BB contributor inspired us with his personal story of becoming a maker and outlined ten ground rules for success. Now, we are thrilled to share with you Adam's full presentation. We hope you find it as illuminating as we did!

For more:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/19/adam-savage-video-ground-rule.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Woodworker mods Ford Transit into camper van
Woodworker mods Ford Transit into camper van

This post is sponsored by the Ford Transit Connect:

When talented woodworker Eric Cournoyer isn't immersed in sawdust, you'd likely find him amongst the trees in their more natural state. An avid outdoorsman, Eric frequently mountain bikes the back trails around his home of Worcester, MA.. After seeing a friend's traditional camper van, Eric was inspired to create his own handcrafted custom camper that would double as his daily driver. The Ford Transit Connect proved to be the perfect platform for Eric to remake into a mobile base camp. His approach? Fine carpentry expressed through a modular box system that's easily reconfigurable for quick trips from his city's streets into the surrounding wilderness.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/18/woodworker-mods-ford-transit-i.html

Chris Noessel: lessons of science fiction computer interfaces
Chris Noessel: lessons of science fiction computer interfaces

What can Logan's Run, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones, and Shrek teach us about computer interface design? Veteran designer Chris Noessel explored these very questions in Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction, an outstanding book he co-authored with Nathan Shedroff. The two spent years collecting and analyzing brilliant, outlandish, and downright ridiculous technologies in SF cinema and TV to tease out practical knowledge that interface and interaction designers can use today in the real world. At Boing Boing: Ingenuity, our live event in San Francisco on August 18, Noessel gave us a tour of his favorite (and least favorite) "outsider-art interfaces" as seen on TV, and the big screen.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/18/chris-noessel-the-lessons-of.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Live in the Memory Palace: Ferris wheels, giant lobsters, and Samuel Morse
Live in the Memory Palace: Ferris wheels, giant lobsters, and Samuel Morse

Nate DiMeo is a master storyteller whose wonderful podcast The Memory Palace reveals hidden, forgotten, and surprising bits of history through short narratives. At Boing Boing: Ingenuity, our live theatrical event on August 18, Nate presented the Memory Palace on stage for the first time, complete with sound effects that he manually triggered. Nate shared three stories, taking the audience on a captivating journey from the construction of the first Ferris Wheel in 1893, to a time when massive lobsters beckoned to us from the seashore, and closing with the tragic tale of why painter S.F.B. Morse invented the telegraph. It was a magical 15 minutes and I hope you enjoy this video of that special moment.

For more:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/17/live-in-the-memory-palace-fer.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Megan Prelinger: Art, Advertising, and Outer Space
Megan Prelinger: Art, Advertising, and Outer Space

Rogue librarian Megan Prelinger is co-founder of the incredible Prelinger Library, an independent, public research library of outré ephemera, (un)popular culture, curious maps, forgotten periodicals, and other 19th and 20th century high weirdness on paper. Megan is also a space geek who explored her offworld interests by examining the mid-20th century space race through its impact on advertising, corporate messaging, and graphic design. Megan synthesized her research into a magnificent book titled Another Science Fiction: Advertising the Space Race 1957 - 1962. That book served as the launch pad for Megan's fascinating, inspiring, and beautiful talk at our Boing Boing: Ingenuity theatrical event in San Francisco on August 18.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/16/megan-prelinger-art-advertis.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Astronomer Seth Shostak: We'll find ET by 2037!
Astronomer Seth Shostak: We'll find ET by 2037!

SETI chief astronomer Seth Shostak bet hundreds of people at our Boing Boing: Ingenuity live event that we'll hear from an extraterrestrial within 25 years. Watch this video to understand why the odds are in Seth's favor.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/13/astronomer-seth-shostak-well.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Tom Vanderbilt: the counterintuitive science of traffic
Tom Vanderbilt: the counterintuitive science of traffic

If I had a chauffeur, I'd want it to be Tom Vanderbilt. I have no idea if Tom is a good driver, but he has a wealth of compelling, curious, and provocative knowledge about the psychology and science of our lives behind the wheel. He's the author of the bestselling book "Traffic: Why We Drive The Way We Do (And What It Says About Us" that has enlightened everyone from transportation policy groups to road safety consortiums to those of us who just insist that no matter what lane we're in, the other one is moving faster. Tom gave a fantastic talk at Boing Boing: Ingenuity, our theatrical experience on August 18, 2013 in San Francisco where he imparted wisdom on late merging, the demographics of honking, and highway hypnosis.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/12/tom-vanderbilt-the-counterint.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Ferdinando Buscema: magic, wonder, and Boing Boing: Ingenuity
Ferdinando Buscema: magic, wonder, and Boing Boing: Ingenuity

Ferdinando Buscema is a magic experience designer whose work draws from mechanical engineering, sleight-of-hand, and his explorations of hermetic traditions. We couldn't have asked for a more astonishing opening presentation at Boing Boing: Ingenuity, our theatrical experience that took place at a former Masonic Lodge in San Francisco on August 18. During his performance, Buscema revealed the final secret of the Illuminati, and guessed my password, which I have since changed. We look forward to future collaborations with Ferdinando whose wizardry and warmth is an inspiration to Happy Mutants everywhere! Get illuminated.

For more:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/10/ferdinando-buscema-magic-won.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

SmartBrake: Back window car display
SmartBrake: Back window car display

Al Linke and Ytai Ben-Tsvi took home the "Best Hardware" prize at the Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day on August 17. Their creation was a "smart brake light" prototype. Using Ford's OpenXC data platform, the device reads the car's gas pedal position and brake inputs and displays contextual animations on the monitor.

As seen in the video above, colored bars indicate how far the gas pedal has been pushed. A graphic of a foot pressing on a brake pedal plays when the brakes are on. In addition, a button press triggers a "Thanks" graphic, which can be used as a way to thank someone who allowed you to merge in a traffic lane.

Al and Ytai took home a gift basket from our friends at Adafruit Industries.

In the coming days, we'll post more videos of the other Data Driven award winners.

openxc
openxc

A cost-of-driving meter for your car
A cost-of-driving meter for your car

Imagine a taxi-meter style display that shows you the true cost of driving for every trip you take in your car. That's just what David Harris and Steven Kryskalla built at the Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day on August 17.

Using Ford's OpenXC data platform, Harris and Kryskalla assembled a proof-of-concept system that displays, in realtime, how much it costs to drive both short trips and long commutes. It could eventually incorporate fuel cost, wear-and-tear, servicing, depreciation, etc. They created the display as physical "taxi meter," a mobile phone app, and as a website.

Harris and Kryskalla were awarded the "Best Use of Data" award, and took home a gift basket from SpikenzieLabs and a pair of Audeze audiophile headphones.

Prototype could help save kids and animals locked in a hot car
Prototype could help save kids and animals locked in a hot car

Stephanie Vacher, Lisa Ballard, Quentin Muhlert addressed the problem of children and pets suffering from heat stroke after accidentally being left inside hot cars. The trio created a proof-of-concept warning system called TempAssure at at the Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day on August 17.

TempAssure uses a GPS API to detect the external temperature. If the temperature exceeds a set limit, TempAssure turns on a small fan (which represents the car's air conditioning system). The team says additional work on the concept could include tapping into Ford's OpenXC data platform to collect GPS data (to then pull the external temperature and conditions data from the local area), ignition data (on/off), and parking brake data (on/off), to create an environment inside of the car that would prevent the occupants from suffering heatstroke (such as turning on the air conditioning, lowering the windows, or sending a text message to the driver's phone).

"Ideally, we would be able to use far more of the car's existing sensors to alert us of the presence of occupants in the car, including seat sensors, internal/external temperature sensors, CO2 sensors, motion sensors, and the built-in microphone," the team wrote in its report of their hack.

TempAssure won the "Best Design" award and took home a gift basket from out friends at Spikenzielabs.

Car composes Kraftwerkian music
Car composes Kraftwerkian music

Tom Zimmerman is one of my favorite hacker/inventors. With over 40 patents awarded, Tom's the creator of the legendary virtual reality navigation device, the Data Glove, and has written a number of fun DIY projects for MAKE magazine. We invited Tom to participate in the Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day on August 17, 2013, and his creation, called Project: Autobahn, was awarded our coveted "Weirdest Hack" prize. He took home a gift basket from our friends at SpikenzieLabs, and a pair of Audeze audiophile headphones.

Project: Autobahn uses OpenXC data as MIDI data to compose and play Kraftwerkian music that matches the driver's behavior. As Tom says in the video, the style of music the car generates could be used to provide feedback to the driver on how safely and efficiently she or he is operating the vehicle.

Car tells robot artist what to paint
Car tells robot artist what to paint

A robot that paints water colors is super. A car that generates dozens of data streams is awesome. When you connect the two, as Joe Grand, Ben Krasnow, "Super-Awesome" Sylvia, and TechNinja did at our Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day held on August 17, 2013, the result is super awesome. It's no surprise that this 3-man, 1-girl team took home our Grand Prize "Best Use of Ford OpenXC" award. The prize: a brand new Replicator 2 desktop 3D printer, courtesy of our friends at MakerBot.

The hack, called the OpenXC Van Go, used Ford's OpenXC platform to collect steering wheel, accelerator, and brake data, which controlled the paintbrush on "Super-Awesome" Sylvia's WaterColorBot. The paint color was selected using the transmission gear position. As the team said, "colorful maps will come to life based on a driver's real world automobile interactions."

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