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Brew coffee 19th century style with a balancing siphon
Brew coffee 19th century style with a balancing siphon

Looking for a whimsical yet scientific way to serve coffee or tea to guests with showy flair? Consider the Continental balancing siphon coffee brewer developed in the 19th century.

This week in Idiombusters
This week in Idiombusters

By Heather Beschizza. Coming soon: Cut Off Your Nose To Spite Your Face.

Bearded Dragons eating meal worms
Bearded Dragons eating meal worms

Mark's bearded dragons love to eat meal worms. He tries to limit them though, because they need to eat their vegetables.

Bob Mould on Boing Boing: interview and performance
Bob Mould on Boing Boing: interview and performance

On the occasion of this month's release of Bob Mould's latest album, the majestic Beauty & Ruin, Bob kindly spent a day with Boing Boing to share his stories and songs from three decades. We are honored to share that singular experience with you here.

This Boing Boing Video was masterfully directed by Scott Compton of San Francisco's mighty Remedy Editorial (http://remedyeditorial.com). Laura Marks produced. Bart Nagel and John Behrens were directors of photography. Sound recording by Philip Perkins. Bart Nagel, John Behrens, Cliff Grodin, and Scott Compton did the shooting. Sterling Storm art directed. Makeup by Deb Czerwinski. Joel White was the video's editor and Marc Pittman mixed the sound. Ayumi Ashley was colorist, Chris Valente handled post production, and Mike Lowe was VFX supervisor. Special thanks to Norman Bonney. Bob Mould is managed by Jordan Kurland and Mike Frye at Zeitgeist Management

More information here:
http://boingboing.net/2014/06/25/bob-mould-old-punk-kicks-new.html

Excuse me... epic terror version
Excuse me... epic terror version

A remix of the Ben Frisch original.

Tim's Vermeer Blu-Ray edition trailer
Tim's Vermeer Blu-Ray edition trailer

Read Tim Jenison's article about recreating the 17th century room in Vermeer's "The Music Lesson"

http://boingboing.net/2014/06/10/vermeers-paintings-might-be.html

Trailer: Bob Mould on Boing Boing
Trailer: Bob Mould on Boing Boing

Coming in June to Boing Boing: Bob Mould, an interview and live performance from this legend of punk rock.

More here:
http://boingboing.net/2014/05/28/bob-mould-on-boing-boing-video.html

Happy Mutant Mobile: First Look!
Happy Mutant Mobile: First Look!

Boing Boing, with support from our sponsor Ford, transformed a 2014 Transit Connect Wagon into the Happy Mutant Mobile! Here's a first look at the nearly complete vehicle.

Directed by Eric Mittleman.

More info:
http://boingboing.net/2014/05/15/boing-boings-happy-mutant-mo-5.html

Spherical Magnet Through an Aluminum Tube, Part 1et2
Spherical Magnet Through an Aluminum Tube, Part 1et2

A useful aspect of the cause-and-effect relationship between electricity and magnetism is that it's reversible."Useful" is an understatement, as modern civilization totally depends on it. Instead of passing electricity through a coil to create a magnetic force, you can pass a magnet through a coil to generate electro-motive force--that is, electricity flowing through the wire. The moving magnetic field interacts with electrons and pushes them around. This principle is used in the generation of electricity in power stations everywhere in the world.

Suppose we imagine a loop of wire becoming a closed ring of metal. Now imagine that the ring is stretched to become a tube. Moving a magnet through the tube still pushes the electrons around, although now they are just running in circles. These circulations are called eddy currents.

For a dramatic demonstration of the consequences, all you have to do is drop a powerful magnet through a tube made of metal that is nonmagnetic but is a good electrical conductor. Copper or aluminum will do the job. The magnet behaves as if it's falling through molasses. Nothing visible is preventing it from falling freely, but its interaction with electrons in the tube requires energy, and the energy is obtained by stealing it from the pull of gravity.

Even this is not the whole story. Electrons flowing through a conductor will generate some heat. This is the principle which causes a fuse to blow if too much current flows through it, as the fuse gets hot and melts.

Very little heat is created if the conductor has a low resistance--but still, the heat is there. Therefore the work that is done by gravity, pulling a magnet through a tube, is converted partially into heat. Energy, as always, is conserved.

In the days when I was learning about electricity and magnetism, I never saw the tube-and-magnet demo. Aluminum was costly back then, and simple iron magnets were not very powerful. A neodymium magnet is necessary to create a significant, dramatic effect. These are the strongest known type of magnets, developed collaboratively by General Motors and Hitachi in the 1980s.

See http://boingboing.net/2014/05/13/magnet.html

Spherical Magnet Through an Aluminum Tube, Part 1
Spherical Magnet Through an Aluminum Tube, Part 1

A useful aspect of the cause-and-effect relationship between electricity and magnetism is that it's reversible."Useful" is an understatement, as modern civilization totally depends on it. Instead of passing electricity through a coil to create a magnetic force, you can pass a magnet through a coil to generate electro-motive force--that is, electricity flowing through the wire. The moving magnetic field interacts with electrons and pushes them around. This principle is used in the generation of electricity in power stations everywhere in the world.

Suppose we imagine a loop of wire becoming a closed ring of metal. Now imagine that the ring is stretched to become a tube. Moving a magnet through the tube still pushes the electrons around, although now they are just running in circles. These circulations are called eddy currents.

For a dramatic demonstration of the consequences, all you have to do is drop a powerful magnet through a tube made of metal that is nonmagnetic but is a good electrical conductor. Copper or aluminum will do the job. The magnet behaves as if it's falling through molasses. Nothing visible is preventing it from falling freely, but its interaction with electrons in the tube requires energy, and the energy is obtained by stealing it from the pull of gravity.

Even this is not the whole story. Electrons flowing through a conductor will generate some heat. This is the principle which causes a fuse to blow if too much current flows through it, as the fuse gets hot and melts.

Very little heat is created if the conductor has a low resistance--but still, the heat is there. Therefore the work that is done by gravity, pulling a magnet through a tube, is converted partially into heat. Energy, as always, is conserved.

In the days when I was learning about electricity and magnetism, I never saw the tube-and-magnet demo. Aluminum was costly back then, and simple iron magnets were not very powerful. A neodymium magnet is necessary to create a significant, dramatic effect. These are the strongest known type of magnets, developed collaboratively by General Motors and Hitachi in the 1980s.

See http://boingboing.net/2014/05/13/magnet.html

Kitten, 9 days old, crying with maximum cuteness
Kitten, 9 days old, crying with maximum cuteness

Ah, listen to this 9 day old kitten's adorable squeals! Warning: MAY CAUSE YOU TO DIE OF CUTENESS. Boing Boing pal Miles O'Brien was learning how to fly his camera drone with one hand after recently becoming one-handed. At the drone flying range near Washington, DC, a friend had a few 9-day old kittens hanging out on a blanket. They're pretty adorable. If you would like to adopt one of them, contact Nikki Driver at ndriver8411@gmail.com. She is a vet, so they're in good hands. She and the kittens are near Charlottesville, VA. Video shot by Miles. —Xeni Jardin.

More about Miles: milesobrien.com/?p=3640
More about the kittens: http://boingboing.net/2014/04/19/kittens.html

Portlandia's Carrie Brownstein chats with Xeni and Mark of Boing Boing
Portlandia's Carrie Brownstein chats with Xeni and Mark of Boing Boing

Xeni Jardin and Mark Frauenfelder of Boing Boing chatted with Portlandia's Carrie Brownstein about the different characters she and Fred Armisen play on the show, what it was like working with the Dead Kennedy's Jello Biafra on an episode, Carrie's upcoming memoir, and what it's like to have a TV show that's more popular on Google than the town it's based in.

Shot at Meltdown Comics in Hollywood, California.

Hawk eats Pigeon: time-lapsed
Hawk eats Pigeon: time-lapsed

With music by Ryan Zak: https://soundcloud.com/moment-music

Hawk eats Pigeon
Hawk eats Pigeon

S. a novel conceived of by J.J. Abrams
S. a novel conceived of by J.J. Abrams

S - http://amzn.to/1aNDTRl

Curious Carrot
Curious Carrot

Pesco's kids' babysitter found this curious carrot in a bag of Bunny-Luv Organic Peeled Baby Carrots. Wonder what kind of machine malfunction produced this anomaly. (Thanks, Kelsie Pyle!)

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/10/01/incredibly-curious-carrot.html

Ford Transit modded into mobile library
Ford Transit modded into mobile library

This post is sponsored by the Ford Transit Connect:

As regular Boing Boing readers know, we are all big library geeks. Nothing beats browsing rows and rows of books where you can take anything that tickles your fancy home with you to read... free! That's why we loved the story of the Batram Trail Regional Library bookmobile, a transformed Ford Transit Connect that replaces the library's 30-year-old vehicle. When the bookmobile and its dedicated librarians visit children's schools, the little ones climb inside while the bigger kids browse their own shelf exposed by opening the Transit Connect's sliding door. If the Batram Trail Regional Library bookmobile isn't parked at pre-K facilities, daycares, and special needs schools, it's likely on its way to a nursing home or making housecalls to homebound readers. Georgia's history of bookmobiles goes back to the Great Depression when custom pick-up trucks piled with books were driven from county to county. Times have changed, but the mission to bring books to everyone remains the same.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/10/01/ford-transit-modded-into-mobil.html

Breaking Bad Science Advisor Dr. Donna J. Nelson: the Boing Boing interview
Breaking Bad Science Advisor Dr. Donna J. Nelson: the Boing Boing interview

Miles O'Brien, PBS science correspondent, and Boing Boing's Xeni Jardin interview Dr. Donna J. Nelson, science advisor to the AMC series "Breaking Bad." Dr. Nelson is a professor of chemistry at the University of Oklahoma who specializes in organic chemistry.

Here's our Boing Boing blog post for the interview: http://boingboing.net/2013/09/27/258361.html

More videos, episode recaps, and related fun stuff for fans of the best show on television, in Boing Boing's Breaking Bad archives: http://boingboing.net/tag/breaking-bad.

(Special thanks to video editor Eric Mittleman)

Editor's Note: There's a goof in the title card here--we taped the interview in August 2012, not 2011.

Boing Boing Hack Day: The Director's Cut
Boing Boing Hack Day: The Director's Cut

Watercolors painted by a robot based on vehicle data. A remote control toy car that mimics the route of a real car. A synthesized symphony conducted by your automobile. These were only a few of the fantastic, curious, and delightful projects created in just a day at Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven, our first-ever hack day in San Francisco on August 17. More than 50 folks got their hands dirty with data through our partner Ford's OpenXC hardware and software platform Boing Boing's talented video director Eric Mittleman and his crew captured dozens of hours of video from multiple roving cameras that Eric has now edited into this rollicking short documentary about the experience. Thank you to all of the brilliant hackers who inspire us with their creativity, support of open source, and, yes, ingenuity!

More at:
http://boingboing.net/tag/ingenuity

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max

Adam Savage: Ground Rules for Success
Adam Savage: Ground Rules for Success

The infinitely curious, brilliant, and kind Adam Savage gave the closing benediction at our Boing Boing: Ingenuity theatrical experience at a former Masonic Lodge in San Francisco on August 18. The co-host of Mythbusters, co-founder of Tested, and BB contributor inspired us with his personal story of becoming a maker and outlined ten ground rules for success. Now, we are thrilled to share with you Adam's full presentation. We hope you find it as illuminating as we did!

For more:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/19/adam-savage-video-ground-rule.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Woodworker mods Ford Transit into camper van
Woodworker mods Ford Transit into camper van

This post is sponsored by the Ford Transit Connect:

When talented woodworker Eric Cournoyer isn't immersed in sawdust, you'd likely find him amongst the trees in their more natural state. An avid outdoorsman, Eric frequently mountain bikes the back trails around his home of Worcester, MA.. After seeing a friend's traditional camper van, Eric was inspired to create his own handcrafted custom camper that would double as his daily driver. The Ford Transit Connect proved to be the perfect platform for Eric to remake into a mobile base camp. His approach? Fine carpentry expressed through a modular box system that's easily reconfigurable for quick trips from his city's streets into the surrounding wilderness.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/18/woodworker-mods-ford-transit-i.html

Chris Noessel: lessons of science fiction computer interfaces
Chris Noessel: lessons of science fiction computer interfaces

What can Logan's Run, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones, and Shrek teach us about computer interface design? Veteran designer Chris Noessel explored these very questions in Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction, an outstanding book he co-authored with Nathan Shedroff. The two spent years collecting and analyzing brilliant, outlandish, and downright ridiculous technologies in SF cinema and TV to tease out practical knowledge that interface and interaction designers can use today in the real world. At Boing Boing: Ingenuity, our live event in San Francisco on August 18, Noessel gave us a tour of his favorite (and least favorite) "outsider-art interfaces" as seen on TV, and the big screen.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/18/chris-noessel-the-lessons-of.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Live in the Memory Palace: Ferris wheels, giant lobsters, and Samuel Morse
Live in the Memory Palace: Ferris wheels, giant lobsters, and Samuel Morse

Nate DiMeo is a master storyteller whose wonderful podcast The Memory Palace reveals hidden, forgotten, and surprising bits of history through short narratives. At Boing Boing: Ingenuity, our live theatrical event on August 18, Nate presented the Memory Palace on stage for the first time, complete with sound effects that he manually triggered. Nate shared three stories, taking the audience on a captivating journey from the construction of the first Ferris Wheel in 1893, to a time when massive lobsters beckoned to us from the seashore, and closing with the tragic tale of why painter S.F.B. Morse invented the telegraph. It was a magical 15 minutes and I hope you enjoy this video of that special moment.

For more:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/17/live-in-the-memory-palace-fer.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Megan Prelinger: Art, Advertising, and Outer Space
Megan Prelinger: Art, Advertising, and Outer Space

Rogue librarian Megan Prelinger is co-founder of the incredible Prelinger Library, an independent, public research library of outré ephemera, (un)popular culture, curious maps, forgotten periodicals, and other 19th and 20th century high weirdness on paper. Megan is also a space geek who explored her offworld interests by examining the mid-20th century space race through its impact on advertising, corporate messaging, and graphic design. Megan synthesized her research into a magnificent book titled Another Science Fiction: Advertising the Space Race 1957 - 1962. That book served as the launch pad for Megan's fascinating, inspiring, and beautiful talk at our Boing Boing: Ingenuity theatrical event in San Francisco on August 18.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/16/megan-prelinger-art-advertis.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Astronomer Seth Shostak: We'll find ET by 2037!
Astronomer Seth Shostak: We'll find ET by 2037!

SETI chief astronomer Seth Shostak bet hundreds of people at our Boing Boing: Ingenuity live event that we'll hear from an extraterrestrial within 25 years. Watch this video to understand why the odds are in Seth's favor.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/13/astronomer-seth-shostak-well.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Tom Vanderbilt: the counterintuitive science of traffic
Tom Vanderbilt: the counterintuitive science of traffic

If I had a chauffeur, I'd want it to be Tom Vanderbilt. I have no idea if Tom is a good driver, but he has a wealth of compelling, curious, and provocative knowledge about the psychology and science of our lives behind the wheel. He's the author of the bestselling book "Traffic: Why We Drive The Way We Do (And What It Says About Us" that has enlightened everyone from transportation policy groups to road safety consortiums to those of us who just insist that no matter what lane we're in, the other one is moving faster. Tom gave a fantastic talk at Boing Boing: Ingenuity, our theatrical experience on August 18, 2013 in San Francisco where he imparted wisdom on late merging, the demographics of honking, and highway hypnosis.

More at:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/12/tom-vanderbilt-the-counterint.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Ferdinando Buscema: magic, wonder, and Boing Boing: Ingenuity
Ferdinando Buscema: magic, wonder, and Boing Boing: Ingenuity

Ferdinando Buscema is a magic experience designer whose work draws from mechanical engineering, sleight-of-hand, and his explorations of hermetic traditions. We couldn't have asked for a more astonishing opening presentation at Boing Boing: Ingenuity, our theatrical experience that took place at a former Masonic Lodge in San Francisco on August 18. During his performance, Buscema revealed the final secret of the Illuminati, and guessed my password, which I have since changed. We look forward to future collaborations with Ferdinando whose wizardry and warmth is an inspiration to Happy Mutants everywhere! Get illuminated.

For more:
http://boingboing.net/2013/09/10/ferdinando-buscema-magic-won.html

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

SmartBrake: Back window car display
SmartBrake: Back window car display

Al Linke and Ytai Ben-Tsvi took home the "Best Hardware" prize at the Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day on August 17. Their creation was a "smart brake light" prototype. Using Ford's OpenXC data platform, the device reads the car's gas pedal position and brake inputs and displays contextual animations on the monitor.

As seen in the video above, colored bars indicate how far the gas pedal has been pushed. A graphic of a foot pressing on a brake pedal plays when the brakes are on. In addition, a button press triggers a "Thanks" graphic, which can be used as a way to thank someone who allowed you to merge in a traffic lane.

Al and Ytai took home a gift basket from our friends at Adafruit Industries.

In the coming days, we'll post more videos of the other Data Driven award winners.

openxc
openxc

A cost-of-driving meter for your car
A cost-of-driving meter for your car

Imagine a taxi-meter style display that shows you the true cost of driving for every trip you take in your car. That's just what David Harris and Steven Kryskalla built at the Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day on August 17.

Using Ford's OpenXC data platform, Harris and Kryskalla assembled a proof-of-concept system that displays, in realtime, how much it costs to drive both short trips and long commutes. It could eventually incorporate fuel cost, wear-and-tear, servicing, depreciation, etc. They created the display as physical "taxi meter," a mobile phone app, and as a website.

Harris and Kryskalla were awarded the "Best Use of Data" award, and took home a gift basket from SpikenzieLabs and a pair of Audeze audiophile headphones.

Prototype could help save kids and animals locked in a hot car
Prototype could help save kids and animals locked in a hot car

Stephanie Vacher, Lisa Ballard, Quentin Muhlert addressed the problem of children and pets suffering from heat stroke after accidentally being left inside hot cars. The trio created a proof-of-concept warning system called TempAssure at at the Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day on August 17.

TempAssure uses a GPS API to detect the external temperature. If the temperature exceeds a set limit, TempAssure turns on a small fan (which represents the car's air conditioning system). The team says additional work on the concept could include tapping into Ford's OpenXC data platform to collect GPS data (to then pull the external temperature and conditions data from the local area), ignition data (on/off), and parking brake data (on/off), to create an environment inside of the car that would prevent the occupants from suffering heatstroke (such as turning on the air conditioning, lowering the windows, or sending a text message to the driver's phone).

"Ideally, we would be able to use far more of the car's existing sensors to alert us of the presence of occupants in the car, including seat sensors, internal/external temperature sensors, CO2 sensors, motion sensors, and the built-in microphone," the team wrote in its report of their hack.

TempAssure won the "Best Design" award and took home a gift basket from out friends at Spikenzielabs.

Car composes Kraftwerkian music
Car composes Kraftwerkian music

Tom Zimmerman is one of my favorite hacker/inventors. With over 40 patents awarded, Tom's the creator of the legendary virtual reality navigation device, the Data Glove, and has written a number of fun DIY projects for MAKE magazine. We invited Tom to participate in the Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day on August 17, 2013, and his creation, called Project: Autobahn, was awarded our coveted "Weirdest Hack" prize. He took home a gift basket from our friends at SpikenzieLabs, and a pair of Audeze audiophile headphones.

Project: Autobahn uses OpenXC data as MIDI data to compose and play Kraftwerkian music that matches the driver's behavior. As Tom says in the video, the style of music the car generates could be used to provide feedback to the driver on how safely and efficiently she or he is operating the vehicle.

Car tells robot artist what to paint
Car tells robot artist what to paint

A robot that paints water colors is super. A car that generates dozens of data streams is awesome. When you connect the two, as Joe Grand, Ben Krasnow, "Super-Awesome" Sylvia, and TechNinja did at our Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day held on August 17, 2013, the result is super awesome. It's no surprise that this 3-man, 1-girl team took home our Grand Prize "Best Use of Ford OpenXC" award. The prize: a brand new Replicator 2 desktop 3D printer, courtesy of our friends at MakerBot.

The hack, called the OpenXC Van Go, used Ford's OpenXC platform to collect steering wheel, accelerator, and brake data, which controlled the paintbrush on "Super-Awesome" Sylvia's WaterColorBot. The paint color was selected using the transmission gear position. As the team said, "colorful maps will come to life based on a driver's real world automobile interactions."

The WaterColorBot
The WaterColorBot

Xeni Jardin interviews "Super Awesome" Sylvia and a young maker med Lux about the WaterColorBot.

Ingenuity Ghost Car
Ingenuity Ghost Car

The Ghost Car, designed and built by Matt Biddulph and Chris Martin, uses Ford's OpenXC platform to allow a toy car to drive a miniaturized version of route taken by a real car. It won the People's Choice Award at the Boing Boing Ingenuity: Data Driven hack day.

Battling Boy
Battling Boy

I'm very excited to be able to launch the trailer for graphic novelist Paul Pope's new book Battling Boy, a major release from FirstSecond that hits shelves in October. -- Cory

Tibet Lobby Day 2013: "Norbuling La (Sungta Lemo)," Thepo Rinpoche and Team Tibet of California
Tibet Lobby Day 2013: "Norbuling La (Sungta Lemo)," Thepo Rinpoche and Team Tibet of California

Read the Boing Boing post: http://goo.gl/Y6ZNL. Thepo Rinpoche and Tibetan activists from California walk the halls of US Congress and Senate office buildings in Washington DC, during Tibet Lobby Day 2013. As they walked, they sang the popular Tibetan song, "Norbuling La (Sungta Lemo)."

Left to right in this video, they are:

1.  Tenzin Dhasang  (SFRTibetan Youth Congress)
2.  Tenzin Rangdrol (President of SFRTibetan Youth Congress)
3.  Tenzin Tselha (SFStudent for free Tibet)
4.  Kasang Dorjee (Vice President of Tibetan Association of Northern California)
5.  Thepo Tulku
(Tibetan Association of Northern California and Santa Barbara Tibet Summit)
6.   Tsering Dolkar (Secretary of SFRTibetan Youth Congress)

(Xeni Jardin for BoingBoing.net)

Hitler finds out Boing Boing killed comments, moved to Discourse
Hitler finds out Boing Boing killed comments, moved to Discourse

We're doing away with comments and launching the Boing Boing BBS. http://boingboing.net/2013/06/27/can-we-talk.html

Created with the "Hitler Finds Out" video generator by Xeni and Dean. Roll your own Hitler video at http://downfall.jfedor.org/

Story of the Source Family Birth Rope: Isis Aquarian in Hawaii
Story of the Source Family Birth Rope: Isis Aquarian in Hawaii

"The Source Family" [http://goo.gl/tyLGA] a documentary by Boing Boing pal Jodi Wille and Maria Demopoulos, tells the story of Father Yod and his Source Family, a radical, utopian social experiment that emerged from the Los Angeles freak scene in the 1970s. Isis Aquarian, one of the Source Family members featured in that documentary, sat down with Boing Boing at her home on the island of Oahu to share a special artifact from the Source Family treasure chest. It is the "Birth Rope," a handmade rope on to which were tied the names of each child born into the flower child cult—including Isis' own daughter.

Shot by, and told to, Boing Boing co-editor Xeni Jardin. This Boing Boing video clip is not part of the documentary.

More on the Source Family documentary here [http://goo.gl/tyLGA].

They had a rock band! [http://goo.gl/sCaEj]

Weird Wheeled Wonders and Maker Faire Bay Area 2013
Weird Wheeled Wonders and Maker Faire Bay Area 2013

Just a few of the fun robots, rovers, and rides I came across at Maker Faire Bay Area 2103

Guatemala: courtroom just after Ríos Montt genocide trial guilty verdict
Guatemala: courtroom just after Ríos Montt genocide trial guilty verdict

iPhone video I shot on May 10, 2013, inside the courtroom in Guatemala City moments after former US-backed dictator José Efraín Ríos Montt was convicted of genocide and crimes against humanity, and sentenced to a total of 80 years in prison.
—Xeni Jardin

Guatemala video snapshot: Youth protest in Supreme Court during genocide trial
Guatemala video snapshot: Youth protest in Supreme Court during genocide trial

A video snapshot: youth protesting in favor of the historic trial against former US-backed military dictator Rios Montt and his then-intelligence chief, Mauricio Rodriguez Sanchez. They are charged with genocide and crimes against humanity during the bloodiest phase of Guatemala's 36-year internal armed conflict, in which some 200,00 people died, most of whom were Mayan indigenous.

Guatemala: Banner with names of dead, at genocide protest
Guatemala: Banner with names of dead, at genocide protest

Relatives of people killed during Guatemala's armed conflict hold up a banner with the names of the dead, during a protest on April 22, 2013 outside the Constitutional Court. On this day, the court was deliberating over whether to allow the continuation of a historic trial for charges of genocide and crimes against former general and dictator osé Efraín Ríos Montt and his chief of intelligence Jose Mauricio Rodriguez Sanchez. Montt's regime was supported by the United States, and the general received military training at the School of the Americas.

Quadcopter Fun
Quadcopter Fun

I bought Jane a $60 quadcopter from Banggood for her 10th birthday. One of the motor wires was broken on arrival so I had to solder it back on, and the battery charger was for a European power outlet so I broke it open and soldered on a US plug. Now it works and it's a lot of fun. It has a built in video camera, too!

It has two control modes. Mode 1 is the "beginner mode," which doesn't allow for tight turns. We like Mode 2, because it's actually easier to control. You can flip the captor 360 with the touch of a button on the transmitter, which Jane loves.

Here's a video of Jane flying it and me being paranoid that she's going to get it stuck in a tree. She ends up landing it in the street, and I say a naughty word.

Michael Madsen Talks to Boing Boing about His Hot Sauce
Michael Madsen Talks to Boing Boing about His Hot Sauce

Michael Madsen came to my house to talk about his line of hot sauces. My favorite is his hot mustard. I put it on a frankfurter and devoured my "Reservoir Dog." http://michaelmadsenhotsauce.com/

Kal Spelletich's "Huggerer" robot
Kal Spelletich's "Huggerer" robot

Post here:
http://boingboing.net/2013/04/11/hugging-robot.html

And check out Kal's work here:
http://kaltek.org

Remote Operated Vehicles recovering Apollo F-1 engines 3 miles beneath Atlantic (Bezos Expeditions)
Remote Operated Vehicles recovering Apollo F-1 engines 3 miles beneath Atlantic (Bezos Expeditions)

Remote Operated Vehicles recovering Apollo F-1 engines three miles beneath the Atlantic. Video courtesy Bezos Expeditions. Boing Boing blog post: http://boingboing.net/2013/03/20/apollo-f-1-engines-recovered-f.html

More on the mission, from Bezos Expeditions: http://bezosexpeditions.com/updates.html

Excerpt from Jeff Bezos' blog post, March 20, 2013:

"What an incredible adventure. We are right now onboard the Seabed Worker headed back to Cape Canaveral after finishing three weeks at sea, working almost 3 miles below the surface. We found so much. We've seen an underwater wonderland -- an incredible sculpture garden of twisted F-1 engines that tells the story of a fiery and violent end, one that serves testament to the Apollo program. We photographed many beautiful objects in situ and have now recovered many prime pieces. Each piece we bring on deck conjures for me the thousands of engineers who worked together back then to do what for all time had been thought surely impossible."

"Many of the original serial numbers are missing or partially missing, which is going to make mission identification difficult. We might see more during restoration. The objects themselves are gorgeous."

"The technology used for the recovery is in its own way as otherworldly as the Apollo technology itself. The Remotely Operated Vehicles worked at a depth of more than 14,000 feet, tethered to our ship with fiber optics for data and electric cables transmitting power at more than 4,000 volts. We on the team were often struck by poetic echoes of the lunar missions. The buoyancy of the ROVs looks every bit like microgravity. The blackness of the horizon. The gray and colorless ocean floor. Only the occasional deep sea fish broke the illusion."

Interview with Gizmodo's Gadget Testers
Interview with Gizmodo's Gadget Testers

Former Boing Boing gadget guv'nor Joel Johnson will have his own TV pilot, Gizmodo: The Gadget Testers, tonight at 10:20/9:20c on BBC America, right after the season finale of Top Gear. He'll be joined by Veronica Belmont, Greg Foot and O.J. Borg, Joe Brown and Chris Hardwick, and they will all play with their gadgets. Mark Frauenfelder interviewed Joel, Veronica, and Greg about the show.

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